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The Emergency Contraception Website - Your website for the "Morning After"

What is Emergency Contraception

**PLEASE NOTE: As of August 31, 2020, this site is no longer being updated**

 

Emergency contraception is birth control that prevents pregnancy after sex, which is why it is sometimes called "the morning after pill," "the day after pill," or "morning after contraception." You can use emergency contraception right away - or up to five days after sex - if you think your birth control failed, you didn't use contraception, or you were made to have sex against your will.


Emergency contraception makes it much less likely you will get pregnant. But emergency contraceptives are not as effective as birth control that's used before or during sex, like the pill or condoms. So if you are sexually active or planning to be, don't use emergency contraception as your only protection against pregnancy. Also, emergency contraception does not protect against sexually transmitted infections, like HIV (only condoms do). For help choosing the best regular method for you, try these free online tools: Bedsider, or My Contraception Tool (from a UK-based educational website).


Your options for emergency contraception include:

 

Read our detailed academic review of the medical and social science literature about emergency contraception in English or Spanish.

 

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**PLEASE NOTE: AS OF AUGUST 31, 2020, THIS SITE IS NO LONGER BEING UPDATED**

 

This website is operated by the Office of Population Research at Princeton University and has no connection with any pharmaceutical company or for-profit organization.

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